Dumaresq

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Dumaresq family page
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Jean Dumaresq and his wife

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Origin of Surname

The original Dumaresq came from swampy surroundings, for Maresq and Marest are both Old French for a marsh. It may well be that this is one of the few surnames of importance to have had their origins in Jersey rather than having been imported from France or elsewhere.

The name is not found in France today, nor are there believed to be any Dumaresq families in Jersey.

Early records

This was one of the most important families in Jersey from the 13th century onwards.

A Jordan du Maresq was Jurat of the Royal Court in 1292 and a reasonably reliable descendancy can be traced from another Jordan, born in about 1300, and possibly his son, to the present day. (See below). Edouard and Richard Dumaresq are listed in the Jersey Chantry Certificate of 1550 but strangely the name does not appear in modern records of those in the 13th century Assize Rolls, which are a recognised way of establishing a rough date for the timing of the first appearance of a family name in Jersey.

However, the transcription of the 1274 Extente published in the late 19th Century by La Société Jersiaise shows that Peter and William du Marais were landowners in Trinity, Philippe du Marais is shown as an elector in Saint Brelade; William du Marais, Peter Maret, Luke Mareys, Philip des Mareys, and William des Mareys are all mentioned, as is Jordan du Marais in a case brought against parishioners of Saint Lawrence.

Sir John Dumaresq 1869

From Payne's Armorial of Jersey

Few families in Jersey can boast a more lengthened lineage or more distinguished members than that of Dumaresq. It is one of the few patrician houses of the island, the representatives of which have, from the earliest historic period, held offices of trust and distinction in the public service of Jersey.

Falle, the historian, makes special mention of its rank and antiquity, and congratulates himself upon his connection with it.

The first insular settler of the name is stated to have been of a Norman family, and to have migrated in the suite of certain ecclesiastics who visited Jersey for the purpose of dedicating one of the parish churches, in the early part of the thirteenth century. The earliest official mention of the name occurs in a roll of the Exchequer, 21 Edward I, recording assizes held in Jersey, 23 November, 1292, in which Jordan Du Maresq appears as a Jurat of the Royal Court of the island.

The name has been variously spelt De Marisco, De Marais, Dumareys, and Dumarescq a name which was not, at one period, peculiar to the island; for in 1217 John De Marisco held the See of Durham, and in 1272 William De Mareys held lands in Oxford. There exists, however, no evidence to prove the common origin of the Jersey and English families.

That of Jersey appears primarily to have been established in the parish of Saint Brelade, where it held the estate of La Haule. So early as the reign of Edward II, William Dumaresq was Attorney-General of the island, and is justly remembered with admiration on account of his successful and able defence of the liberties and privileges of his countrymen before John de Fressingfield, Drogo De Barentine, and John De Button, the Commissioners appointed by the King to inquire into the legislative and jurisdictive state of the island.

From La Haule a branch settled at Vinchelez de Bas, of which fief it obtained the Seigneurie in 1486; whence, about 1500, John, son of Thomas Dumaresq, Seigneur of Vinchelez de Bas and of Gorge, by his marriage with Mabel Payn, the lady of Samares, removed to that Fief Haubert, which remained in the possession of his descendants for eight generations. Of this branch, Henry Dumaresq, Seigneur of Samares, was conspicuous for the support he gave to the Republican cause at the period of the Great Rebellion, when he was one of the Rebel Commissioners, and for his friendship for Michael Lemprière, the Parliamentarian Bailly of Jersey.

His son Philip, however, appears to have held opposite views, for he figures as a Jurat of the Royal Court very shortly after the Restoration. He was born about 1650, and entered at an early age the Royal Navy, where he rose to Post rank. He is well known as the author of a Survey of Jersey, which he presented to James II. in 1685. The original manuscript is preserved at the British Museum. His only daughter Deborah, who conveyed the Seigneurie of Samares to the Seale family, died without issue.

Sophia Dumaresq

From the family at Samares sprang the various branches of Dumaresq du Morin, Dumaresq des Augres, with. others settled in various parts of the island.

The estate of Morin derives its name from a family once of some note in the island, but now extinct. Perrez Moryn was Lieuteuant-Bailly to Sir John Bernard in 1431, and Nicholas Morin was Bailly under the Count de Maulevrier in 1467. This branch of Dumaresq, now quite extinct, was allied by marriage to some of the best families of the island.

The fief of les Augres was acquired by this family by the marriage of Richard Dumaresq with Collette Larbalestier, its heiress. The family of Larbalestier is one of very early settlement in Jersey, and is said to have derived its patronymic from the fact of an ancestor having held the post of bow-bearer to the Conqueror. Of this branch was the Rev Daniel Dumaresq.

Another branch, several of the members of which are settled in England, is represented by the descendants of Lieutenant-Colonel John Dumaresq and of Philip Dumaresq, late President of the Council at Cape Breton. Its insular, no less than its English, alliances, together with its social position, render it the most prominent portion of this famous honse.

Arms

Gules, three escallops, or ; a martlet for difference. Quartering—Ermines, a cross-bow drawn, charged with an arrow, all argent, for Larbalestier Gules, three escallops, or, a crescent for difference, for Dumaresq Sable, three dolphins, embowed, argent, for De Bagot Argent, three trefoils, sable, for Payn Gules, four fusils in fesse, argent ; an annulet in base, or, for difference, for De Carteret.

Variants

  • Dumaresq, 1299
  • De Marisco
  • De Marais
  • Du Marais
  • Du Mareys
  • Dumareys
  • Dumarescq
  • Maret
  • Mareys
  • des Mareys
  • Du Marecke 1528
  • de, du Marez
  • du Marret
  • du Maresc 1331
  • de Mareke
  • Marek
  • Mareske
  • Marisc 1309
  • Maresque 1299
Dumaresq Bailiffs' seals and signatures

Family records

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Family histories and biographies



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Jersey family trees



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Baptisms




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Great War service


Sons of Charles Dumaresq and Alvine


  • Lancelot Shaw Dumaresq (1885- ) (St B) son of John and Constance Honora, ex-RMIJ, Lieutenant, Coldstream Guards


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Family wills


Family businesses

Family properties

Links

  • Wikipedia article on the Dumaresq naval calculator The inventor of the device, John Saumarez Dumaresq, who would later attain the rank of Rear Admiral and become the first native Australian to command the Australian Naval Fleet, was a direct descendant of John Dumaresq and Rachel Bandinel of St Saviour, Jersey

Family coats of arms

Family photographs

Family gravestones

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