Electricity

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Generators on the Albert Pier in 1949
TIMELINE

From the Jersey Electricity Company website

  • April 1924: Jersey Electricity Company registered
  • November 1924: Cable laying began in David Place, St Helier
  • July 1925: Company began generating at Albert Pier
  • 1929: 1,000th customer connected; shop, office and stores move to 72 King Street; mains department to Castle Street
  • 1931: Sports and social club formed
  • May 1934: Queen’s Road power station opened
  • August 1936: States of Jersey acquire controlling interest in company
  • January 1939: Shop and offices at 11 Broad Street opened
  • 1940-1945: Company under control of Essential Services Committee during German Occupation
  • 1944: St Peter’s power station commissioned
  • January 1945: Supply to civilian population discontinued and generating sets at Queen’s Road requisitioned by occupying forces
  • March 1958: Senator Cyril Le Marquand succeeded Senator Frank Le Quesne as chairman
  • 1963: Decision made to build La Collette power station
  • March 1966: First 30mW turbine set at La Collette commissioned
  • October 1967: Contract department joins mains and transport at Queen’s Road
  • November 1973: Ceremonial opening of La Collette power station. Third 30 mW turbine started
  • May 198: First undersea supply cable link with France commissioned
  • October 198: Quick-start gas turbines commissioned at Queen’s Road
  • October 1994: New 45 mW extension to La Collette power station opened
  • 1995: Decision taken to lay second undersea cable to France in co-operation with Guernsey Electricity
  • November 2000: Second undersea cable link with France and new connection to Guernsey commissioned
  • 2004: Decision taken to lay third cable to France

Jersey did not have a mains electricity supply until 1924, over 40 years after the world’s first service was established in Godalming, Surrey. This was largely because much political infighting and a battle with the vested interests of gas suppliers caused many years delay after the initial States decision in 1897 to light the streets with electricity.

As early as 1883 some companies and individuals installed generators to provide electricity for their own premises - notably A de Gruchy and Co, who lit their arcade in this way.

Newspaper opposition

Electricity companies, including Channel Islands Electric Light and Power Company, were established, but failed to gain much business, partly because of the opposition of newspapers such as the British Press and Jersey Times which wrote in 1880:

"Electric lighting cannot, so far, be regarded as a success in itself."

Despite considerable doubts about the 'new' source of power, a proposal was put to the States on 23 February 1897 to replace gas street lighting with electric. The proposal was approved the following January. And then nothing happened until 1903, when a St Helier parish assembly was called to discuss plans to provide electric lights on Victoria Avenue. The Jersey Electric Committee informed the meeting that the Edmondson Electric Corporation was interested in tendering, but wary of a lack of official support for laying cables.

Nothing was to happen for another ten years, but in 1913 another committee was set up to examine the proposals for street lighting. It's recommendation was to give one company exclusive supply rights and let them go ahead. A parish assembly agreed to put the proposals out to tender, and London company Durell Walker and Co were on the point of signing a contract when an article written under the pseudonyn 'Querist' in the Evening Post questioned the benefits of electric street lighting, which was said to have proved more expensive than gas in Guernsey. The writer questioned the standing of the company and wrote:"The public have been misled from the beginning, and are being fooled now."

A stormy parish assembly ensued, at which the Evening Post's proprietor was prevented from speaking and the newspaper's reporter was denied access to the documents presented.

Libel action

A protracted legal process ensued, with Mr Guiton accused of libel and himself suing the Constable for preventing free speech. It was 1914, and the First World War had started, and the libel action was abandoned the following year, and Mr Guiton lost his action against the Constable. Durell Walker and Co went into receivership, and plans for electric lighting stalled again. In June 1919 there was a strong vote at the Town Hall in favour of continuing with gas lighting; a vote further strengthened in 1922.

However, within 18 months the parish had decided to go ahead with the switch to electricity, the Jersey Electricity Company was formed in 1924, cable laying under the town streets started in David Place and generating plant was installed on the Albert Pier. The supply started in July 1925. By the end of the year, 1,000 customers had been connected.

In May 1934 a power station was opened at Queen’s Road. The Parish continued to administer the concession until 1936, when the States bought all the shares in the company. Although shares have been issued to the public, the States have retained overall control of the company, which supplies electricity throughout the island.

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Links

Jersey Electricity Company website

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