Sir Edward Seymour

From theislandwiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Edward Seymour

Sir Edward Seymour - Governor of Jersey 1537-1550


The year that Henry VIII died, Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset, uncle of the youthful King Edward VI and for some two years Lord Protector of England, entered into the office of the Governorship of Jersey, Lieut-General Henry Cornish being made Lieut-Governor under him.

The Governor appointed after the death of Sir Anthony Ughtred was Sir Arthur Darcy, who had only held the office for a short time when Thomas, Lord Vaux, who was anxious "to obtain so good a post," exchanged a valuable property in Northamptonshire with Darcy for the appointment, without consulting or advising the King who, when he was solicited to confirm the bargain, is reported to have told him plainly that "he would not trust the keeping of such an Island as Jersey into the hands of a man who could not keep his own lands*.

The King gave Lord Vaux permission to transfer the office to any third party who should meet with his approval, and also to receive a sum in recompense. The result was that Edward Seymour, then Viscount Beauchamp, and afterwards Duke of Somerset, became the purchaser.

Seymour was not interested in the position, merely its income, and appointed Robert Raymond as his Lieutenant from 1537 to 1541, followed by Henry Cornish.

Seymour relinquished the post in 1550 in favour of Sir Hugh Paulet, the first of this distinguished family to occupy the position over the next 50 years.

Defences

Seymour, through his Lieutenants, took an interest in the island's defences and in 1546 he wrote to the Bailiffs and Jurats of the island requiring 'four sufficient and able men to be and remain continually at Saint Aubin's Tower, being appointed with ordnance and munition for the preservation thereof, and the better defence of the said country'.

Personal tools
other Channel Islands
contact and contributions
Donate

Please support theislandwiki.org with a donation to our hosting costs