Three Mile House

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Historic Jersey buildings


Three Mile House, St Saviour


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Property name

Three Mile House [1]

Other names

  • D`Auprès du Morin
  • La Pierre des Trois Milles

Location

Grande Route de St Martin, St Saviour

Type of property

16th century farm complex with 18th century alterations

Valuations

Sold for £1,010,000 in 2010

Families associated with the property

  • Messervy:This was the property of Jurat Edouard Messervy, who had been an Advocate from 1542-1562, Deputy-Viscount in 1544-1549, Attorney-General and then Jurat, 1566-1574. He was a former Constable of St Saviour. His family continued to live here until the end of the 17th century. It thus has a well-documented history from the first half of the 16th century. There is also no reason to doubt that it existed prior to this date, perhaps in Messervy ownership or that of their predecessors
  • Le Couteur
  • Godfray

Datestones

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Historic Environment Record entry

Listed building

The property is of interest as an historic farm group with circa 1600s origins [3] and 18th century remodelling, which includes the notable survival of a round-headed doorway and early stonework on the house and roadside range.

The former farmstead [4] has evidence of habitation since the 17th century or earlier. It is clearly shown as a free-standing farmstead on the Richmond Map of 1795 and 1935 maps.

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Previously named Pierre des Trois Milles after the early 19th century milestone erected opposite.

The former farm group has a parallel plan comprising a principal farm house with dower in a linear range attached to former working buildings, sited opposite to a parallel range of working buildings on the roadside. The principal house has a north front of early date, with the south front re-faced in the 18th century.

The north front is two-storey rubble granite and includes a nine-stone round-headed doorway of pre-1700 style, and four-stone chamfered window at first floor. The south front is a more formalised five-bay, two-storey, faced with ashlar granite. The slate roof has 19th century brick chimneys.

Adjoining is a two-storey, three-bay dower - possibly raised from single storey, as evidenced by a gable kneeler.

The rooms are dry lined with original room partitions and staircase removed. There is a corbelled granite fireplace in the main reception room, but this has been remodelled from the original.

To the north of the house is a single storey range of former working buildings in rubble granite. The roadside elevation includes some apparently early stonework and rudimentary four-stone openings. The west gable is also original with a gable kneeler and remains of a stone gate pivot.

20th century alterations include apparent reconstruction of the south wall and insertion of a doorway and window in the north wall. Later slate roof and brick chimney.

Old Jersey Houses

There are relics of a double round arch, which was still there earlier in this [20th] century. It is now the entrance arch at La Maison Maret. There is another round arch facing west, and some chamfered windows with holes for iron bars. There is also a granite fireplace of traditional design.

Notes and references

  1. It is opposite the stone marking three miles from the Royal Square
  2. Lintel originally recorded as ALC ILC 1743. The photograph suggests that it has recently been cleaned
  3. This was the property of Jurat Edouard Messervy, who had been an Advocate from 1542-1562, Deputy-Viscount in 1544-1549, Attorney-General and then Jurat, 1566-1574. He was a former Constable of St Saviour. The property thus has a well-documented history from the first half of the 16th century. There is, furthermore, no reason to doubt that it existed prior to this date, perhaps in Messervy ownership or that of their predecessors
  4. This is not an expression used for a farm in Jersey. It is also unwise to assume that a house is a farmhouse merely because it is situated in the country. The earliest known owners, Messervy, were a family of lawyers, father-to-son for five generations. Their successors, Le Couteur, were mostly clergymen
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