Mont Pellier

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Jersey houses


Mont Pellier, Trinity


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Property name

Mont Pellier

Location

Rue du Mont Pellier, Trinity

Type of property

17th century country house with probable earlier origins

Valuations

Sold for £2,950,000 in 2020

Families associated with the property

  • Grandin
  • Pellier: OJH says that there is a record that on 9 October 1685 a boat left St Lo and was wrecked near Rozel two days later, several of its occupants drowning. [1] This was a Huguenot family of substance, accompanied by servants, and they settled in Jersey. The head of the family was Isaac Chauval dit Pelier, who returned to France after the shipwreck, and later came back to Jersey to buy the house which would become Mont Pellier from Jean Grandin. However, it is said that the house was built by Jean Grandin in 1684, which seems to contradict the 1641 datestone

Datestones

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  • 1641 IGD - for Jean Grandin, who married Marie du Feu, and was the father of Hugh Grandin, Rector of St Peter from 1672-1731. Another stone dated 1681 records alterations to the building, which overall has many features which can be attributed to one or other of the 17th century datestones.
  • DPL 1706- For Daniel Pellier
  • DPL EGF - For Daniel Pellier
  • 17 DPL ♥ MRS 28 - For Daniel Pellier and Marguerite Richardson
  • IMR ♥♥ MCB 1732 - For Josue Marett and Marie Cabot [2]
  • 17 DPL ♥ MRS 42 - For Daniel Pellier and Marguerite Richardson
  • PG 1686 HG and RML underneath the date - For Philippe Godfray and his parents Helier and Rachel, nee Mylays [3]
  • ILB ♥ EHQ 1777 - For Jean Le Boutillier and Esther Hocquard. The datestone was originally from the demolished property Le Binaud

Historic Environment Record entry

Listed building

A 17th century Jersey house, of possibly earlier origins, with a good survival of original interior and exterior features from 17th century and 18th century, and integrity as a group in a distinctive landscape setting. Other buildings of group value.

Datestone 1681 may relate to heightening of the roof. Additional rooms on north dated 1788.

Double arches are 20th century reconstruction using original stonework.

Shown on the Richmond Map of 1795. Five-bay two-storey main house with single storey press house on the southeast side, dovecote detached to the southwest, and double arch at east entrance and on roadside entrance.

Accolade lintels over three first floor and three ground floor windows, all of which have chamfered uprights, with quoins used to heighten and lower openings. First floor west window may be a later alteration as it has none of these features. Window over the door is offset, supporting the theory that the doorway may originally have been an arch - now a chamfered doorcase with accolade lintel. Well by doorway. [4]

The principal interior interest is in the main house - single pile, two-room wide with central passage, tourelle at rear with extensions; adjoins press house on east side. Central passage combined with room on east side. This room has a large granite fireplace with slender uprights and corbels and a joggled lintel that appears to have been altered at some point.

Stone door surround into press house; chamfered oak beam. Room on west side has a large granite fireplace with slender chamfered uprights and joggled lintel, partly showing. The centre beam rests on stone corbels and has roll moulding.

Square tourelle tower and outshot extensions on either side of it. Window of staircase with stone surrounds, including position of iron bars visible in one room. Tourelle rises to attic floor. The only feature of interest in the Press House is a ground floor fireplace in north gable with uprights chamfered on both sides and chamfered corbels with acorn chamfer stops, and stone lintel above. A benitier was discovered in early 1934. It is located in the main room of the upper floor and is a recess formed in the gable wall of the house and the left side is the corner formed by the front wall.

Old Jersey Houses

This property is covered in some detail in Vol One but the entry and the addendum in later editions are contradictory and confusing. It is suggested that the property was named after Daniel Pellier, who became owner in 1706. At that time, however, Jersey properties did not have names, and although it undoubtedly ultimately took the Pellier family's name, it is likely to have been some considerable time after 1706. The choice of Mont is strange, because the property is in a valley, not on a hillside.

The author disputes the existence of a benetier, suggesting that it was a small cupboard.

The entry notes that additional rooms have been built on the north of the house, dated 1788, enclosing the tourelle, which is not apparent from the outside

The double arch is not original, but was moved here from The Hollies.

Notes and references

  1. This seems unlikely, because St Lo is some considerable distance from the coast and not on a river with a mouth opposite Jersey
  2. OJH says that this stone was moved from another property
  3. This was originally at The Hollies, St Clement
  4. The record states that the house is five-bay, but this description and the photograph indicate that it is four-bay
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