No 7 King Street

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7 King Street


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On the left of this picture taken in the 1970s are Nos 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 up to the Linscott's sign


The earliest record we have so far located for an occupant of No 7 King Street is in 1834, when a hairdresser named Vickery was trading there. He was followed by clockmaker Augustus Le Fortier, who moved from No 17 to No 7 in 1837, and then on to Halkett Place in about 1845.

A picture from the 1980s, showing Nos 7 to 15 on the left
No 7

William Netten

William Netten, a hatter born about 1821, seems to have come and gone from No 7. The 1841 census shows him living here, but by 1851 he and his young family are shown living at 1 Don Street, making the corner with King Street on the opposite side of the road. In 1861 William Netten, now a merchant, is shown living at No 7 with his wife Emma and five daughters Mary, Ellen, Matilda, Fanny and Alice.

Charles Ramié

The 1851 census shows the premises occupied by draper Charles Francois Ramié, a naturalised British subject born in France. He was married to Eliza Ann Le Brocq, and living with them were their children Eliza Ann (24), Charles William (23) and Julie Marie Josephine (16), the latter shown as simply Julia in the census. Also resident were three shop assistants, and three house servants. The Ramies had two other children, who had left home by 1851. They were Emilie (1830- ) and Louisa (1833- )

The existence of two different census returns for No 7 in 1851, in different town districts, is somewhat bewildering. The District 6 return shows bookseller and stationer Susan Catherine Gopil as the occupant.

From 1848 Charles traded from No 7 in partnership with William Le Brocq, his sister's husband, as Le Brocq and Ramié. His son Charles, listed as a farmer, clearly worked elsewhere. Perhaps not too far away, though, because St Helier was still predominantly a rural parish and buildings did not stretch far to the north of King Street only 25 years after Halkett Place first opened.

The 1841 census had shown the Ramié family across the road at No 6 King Street, which it is suggested he had purchased around 1834. He may have crossed the street when he went into partnership with Le Brocq. The business was sold in 1851. Charles Ramié was also a ship owner, having purchased two vessels from William Le Brocq in the 1830s.

Dicks

No 7 was occupied by Dicks and Co, bootmakers, from at least 1874, and probably earlier, but the Dicks family do not appear to have lived above the shop because there are no occupants listed in the census returns from 1871 onwards. The business appears to have been run in the early 20th century by Robert and James Dicks, but that is about all that is known of the family. There is but a single baptism entry for the family name in all Jersey's church records before 1842

By 1970 the business was operating as Manfield, still selling boots and shoes. There was another branch further down the same side of the street at No 19, but both were to close by the turn of the century, Thornton Chocolates taking over at No 7.

Chronology

  • 1834 - Mr Vickery, hairderesser
  • 1830s - Augustus Le Fortier, clockmaker
  • 1841 - William Netten, hatter
  • 1848 - Le Brocq and Ramie
  • 1851 - Le Brocq and Ramie (business sold in 1851), draper; Susan Gopil, bookseller
  • 1861 - William Netten, merchant
  • 1874-1960s - Dicks and Co, bootmakers, later just Dicks
  • 1970 - Manfield, boots and shoes

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