Bandinel

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Bandinel family page
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Anc15RachelBandinel.jpg

Rachel Bandinel (1691-1774) wife of Daniel Le Febvre

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Origin of Surname

Bandinel is one of those few Channel Island names whose arrival can be traced exactly, and whose ancestry can be traced back many hundreds of years earlier. It was the Very Rev David Bandinel who was appointed Dean of Jersey and settled there in 1623.

Payne's Armorial of Jersey

The earliest undoubtedly historical record of this ancient and noble family dates from the year 1040 (twenty-six years before the Norman conquest), when its then representative, Bandinello Bandinelli, held the rank of Count, and " Console di giustizia" at Sienna. Tradition, however, as handed down to the present Italian members of the family, traces its descent two centuries higher, when it is said that a distinguished warrior of noble birth, Band-Scinel by name, a native of Aix-in-Provence, was left in charge of Sienna by the Emperor Charlemagne, on returning from his Italian expedition.

But from the year 1040, the descent of the Bandinelli in the direct male line is clearly traced by official and legal documents. Bandinello Bandinelli, above mentioned, had three sons, the founders of three Siennese families of considerable distinction. Eanuccio Bandixelli (whose wife, Muratori designates as "Tedda c primaria vice-comitum nobilitate Pisana ") had two sons, of whom the elder was the ancestor of Count Giulo, of whom presently, and the younger, Rolando, became the celebrated Pope Alexander III., the same who compelled Henry II of England to walk barefoot to the tomb of Thomas a Becket; and, after a long and severe contest, which ended in the liberation of Italy from the German yoke, obliged the renouned Frederic Barbarossa to kiss his toe.

Count Giulo

Amongst the many distinguished heroes of the family, a pre-eminence is generally accorded to Count Giulo, grandson of the elder brother of Rolando (Alexander III), and representative of Ranuccio, and consequently of Bandinello Bandinelli. He led 900 lances to the Holy War, and performed such signal service to St Louis, in his Egyptian expedition, that this monarch bestowed on him as an augmentation to the simple golden shield borne by Bandinello Bandinelli and his descendants.

The family of the Baudinelli, in that and the succeeding centuries, distinguished itself producing six cardinals and other ecclesiastics of note, besides many laymen who obtained renown in politics, diplomacy, and arms. It was, however, in the 16th century that the head of this house achieved a greater triumph than any which had been accomplished by his predecessors, by sacrificing all the worldly advantages of his exalted position for conscience sake. This high-minded nobleman took up his residence at Geneva, where he was, however, greatly distressed at the excesses of the Swiss Reformers, and endeavoured, though fruitlessly, to oppose the prevailing current of opinion.

David Bandinel

His only son, David, in the course of his travels, came to England, where, at the house of her grandfather, Sir Nicholas Stalling, (who was gentleman-usher in daily waiting to Queen Elizabeth and James I) he made the acquaintance of his future wife, Elizabeth Stalling. The tomb of Sir Nicholas Stalling (or, as the name is sometimes spelt, Stallinge and Stallenge) still exists in the parish church of Iveun, Somerset. On 2 August 1602, he was naturalized as a British subject, his letters of naturalization being signed by Sir Walter Raleigh, then Governor of Jersey, where he, as well as many other continental Reformers, had taken up his residence.

David Bandinel, Bandinell, or Bandinelli, having settled in Jersey, where he purchased some property at Saint Martin, partly, as appears, if not wholly, by the sale of his family jewels, became successively Rector of the parishes of Saint Brelade, Saint Mary, and Saint Martin, and Dean of the Island; where his character stood very high for his numerous charities, his great benevolence, his extreme courtesy, and his brilliant and varied talents. He was on terms of intimate friendship with Archbishop Abbott (who tilled the see of Canterbmy from 1611 to 1633), and was held in high estimation by his successor, Laud.

His eldest son, James, entered at Broadgate Hall, Oxford, March 12, 1618-19, and afterwards at Christ Church, in the same university. He took orders in the English church, and became Rector of the parish of Saint Mary. He married Margaret Dumaresq, by whom he had an only son, David. At the conclusion of the struggle that broke out in Jersey, shortly after the commencement of the Great Rebellion, the dean aud his son James, who had rendered themselves peculiarly obnoxious to the De Carteret family, were imprisoned in Mont Orgueil Castle; in a vain attempt to escape from which, on February 10 1644, they were so much injured that the father, who was immediately recaptured, died in 24 hours, and the son, who a few days afterwards met his parent's funeral as he was led back a prisoner, died before the end of a twelvemonth.

Grandson's marriage

David, the Dean's namesake and grandson, married in 1657 Rachel Messervy, the heiress of Bagot. "On tira," says the parish register, "les canons, tant en la dite paroisse de St Sauveur, qu'a celle de S. Martin, avec plusieirs mousquetaires."

The eldest son of this David, George Bandinel, was Seigneur of Melcsches as well as Bagot. He married firstly Elizabeth Poingdestre, by whom he had a son David, whose male line became extinct in the 18th century; and secondly Elizabeth, daughter and co-heiress of Francis De Carteret, and grand-daughter of Sir Philip De Carteret, for many years the bitter antagonist of Dean Bandinel and his son. From George, the only male issue of this marriage, the present family descends.

His grandson, named George after his three immediate ancestors, had a large family, none of whom left any issue. During the first French Revolution, he gave a home to a French priest, Monsieur de Grimouville, who after his death repaid his hospitality by kindness and attention to his surviving daughters. On the restoration of the Bourbons, M. de Grimouville was preferred to the see of Saint Malo. During his residence in Jersey, he took a great interest in the genealogies of the families of the island.

Arms

Arms : Or, in the dexter chief, a round shield, azure, charged with a knight, in full career, spear in rest, argent ; the shield surmounted with the coronet of an Italian count, or.

Variants

  • Bandinelli
  • de Bandinelli
  • de Bandinel

Family records

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Bandinel lineages in Jersey



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Family histories



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Baptisms



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Family wills


These wills created by members of the Bandinel family are now held by Jersey Archive. By visiting the archive site and using the names, dates and reference numbers shown here, it is possible to view a copy of each will. You will have to subscribe to the Archive's online service to do this. To find out more about this collection, which covers the period from 1663 to 1948, and how to search for your family's wills there, visit our Jersey wills page

  • George Bandinel 1734 1734 - D/Y/A/6
  • George Bandinel 4 May 1741 - D/Y/A/7
  • Philip Bandinel of St Saviour, now of St Paul, Covent Garden, Westminster 13 July 1782 - D/Y/A/13
  • Thomas Bandinel of Jersey, now of Chichester 23 January 1749 - D/Y/A/8

Family homes

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